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Learn about the complexity and diversity of human behavior.

Psychology students at Webster University have the opportunity to study the science, philosophical issues, and theories of the discipline in an engaging environment. Offering a diverse psychology curriculum, Webster's psychology professors use approaches that range from the scientific to philosophical and the experimental to theoretical. Through exploration of these methods, psychology students develop and apply problem-solving skills that help them think analytically and communicate persuasively in the professional world.

Webster student in class

Why a Bachelor's Degree in Psychology?

Webster student in class

The psychology graduate has gained skills in scientific, analytical and critical thinking, and is able to apply the scientific method to real-world problems. They have knowledge of human behavior and mental processes, and an appreciation of diverse perspectives. Webster's psychology undergraduate degrees prepare students to pursue graduate study in a wide variety of disciplines or to pursue entry-level jobs in a variety of careers, including social worker, science writer, employment counselor, probation officer, computer programmer, urban planning officer and pharmaceutical sales representative.

Why Choose Webster University?

Webster Athens, part of Webster University's global network of international schools, brings the best of American education to Greece. Class sizes are small and our faculty bring real-life knowledge and personal attention to the classroom.

Webster's Bachelor Programs in Psychology

Bachelor of Science (BS) in Psychology

Webster's BS in Psychology is only available at Webster's international locations, like the Athens, Greece, campus. This program is designed to provide the biological, cognitive, personality and social contexts for understanding the behavior of individuals throughout their lifespan.

Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Psychology

This bachelor's degree program is designed to provide students with a foundation in the field of psychology. Students will gain an understanding of the complexity and diversity of human behavior and the psychological theories and concepts which help explain human behavior.

The number of required credit hours is the clearest difference between the two degrees. Although the BA in Psychology program has the international language requirement, the BS in Psychology does not. Instead, the BS in Psychology requires a core set of four classes (13 credit hours) of non-psychology classes and two additional psychology electives (6 credit hours). The BS in Psychology also requires two classes that the BA in Psychology does not:

  • PSYC 4750 Advanced Statistics (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4825 Senior Thesis (3 hours)

Additionally, the BS in Psychology has two additional learning objectives: detail the biological and genetic underpinnings of human behavior, and develop a research hypothesis based on the available literature in psychology and then collect, analyze and interpret data to address the question.

  Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Arts
Credit Hours 64 credit hours 39 credit hours
Non-Psychology Supporting Core Requirements? Yes No
Language Requirement? No Yes
Required Senior Thesis (PSYC 4825)? Yes Recommended
Required Advanced Statistics (PSYC 4750)? Yes No
Psychology Electives 15 credit hours 9 credit hours

Students who successfully complete the BS in Psychology will have the foundation, research skills and data analysis expertise to succeed in a MA/PhD psychology graduate program (e.g. clinical psychology, experimental psychology, etc.).

Students who successfully complete the BA in Psychology degree may be able to apply psychological principles to become a more effective manager, supervisor or educator. In addition, some students may be able to pursue a variety of career and graduate opportunities within psychology, counseling and related fields (e.g. nursing).

Students graduating with either a Bachelor of Science (BS) or a Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Psychology will need to pursue a graduate degree before they are able to obtain professional licensure. Students are encouraged to check entrance requirements for any post-graduate programs prior to finishing their bachelor's degree at Webster in the event they need to take additional coursework.

Upon completion of the program, students will be able to:

  • Describe the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings and historical trends in psychology.
  • Implement the use of scientific reasoning to interpret psychological phenomena and demonstrate the ability to to interpret, design and conduct basic psychological research using statistical analyses.
  • Apply ethical standards to evaluate psychological science and practice and apply those standards to build and enhance interpersonal relationships locally and globally.
  • Demonstrate effective writing, exhibit effective presentation skills and interact effectively with others.
  • Discuss occupational pursuits available in a variety of settings given their psychological knowledge, skills and values.
  • * Detail the biological and genetic underpinnings of human behavior.
  • * Develop a research hypothesis based on the available literature in psychology and then collect, analyze and interpret data to address the question.

* Bachelor of Science degree only

The 64 credit hours required for the Bachelor of Science in Psychology include the following:

Non-Psychology Supporting Core Requirements:

  • WRIT 1010 The Craft of College Writing (3 hours)
  • MATH 1430 College Algebra (3 hours)
  • BIOL 1010 Human Biology (4 hours)
  • BIOL 1040 Human Genetics (3 hours)

Psychology Core Requirements:

  • PSYC 1100 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 1800 Careers in Psychology (1 hour)
  • PSYC 2750 Introduction to Measurement and Statistics (3 hours)
  • PSYC 2825 Introduction to Research Methods (3 hours)
  • PSYC 2975 Sophomore Assessment (0 hours)
  • PSYC 3025 Psychology and Ethics (2 hours)
  • PSYC 4750 Advanced Statistics* (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4825 Senior Thesis* (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4925 Senior Capstone: History, Philosophy, and Systems of Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4950 Senior Assessment (0 hour)
  • Psychology electives (15 hours)

*Bachelor of Science degree only

At least ONE course from EACH of the following five Perspectives content areas:

The roles of biological processes, structures and inherited tendencies in explaining human behavior.

  • PSYC 3850 Sensation and Perception (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4300 Health Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4550 Drug and Chemical Dependency (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4650 Biopsychology (3 hours)

The diagnosis and treatment of mental, behavioral disorders and adjustment problems.

  • PSYC 3125 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3775 Personality Theory (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3900 Introduction to Counseling (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4225 Introduction to the Helping Professions (3 hours)

Examination of how individuals grow, develop and change throughout the lifespan.

  • PSYC 2200 Child Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 2250 Adolescent Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 2300 Lifespan Development (3 hours)
  • PSYC 2950 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging (3 hours)

Examination of the mental processes and environmental situations that underlie, shape and control behavior.

  • PSYC 3325 Applied Learning Theory (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3350 Cognitive Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3525 Memory (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3725 Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making (3 hours)

The roles of social and cultural influences on behavior.

  • PSYC 3475 International Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3575 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3600 Social Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3625 Motivation and Emotion (3 hours)

The 39 credit hours required for the Bachelor of Arts in Psychology include the following:

  • PSYC 1100 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 1800 Careers in Psychology (1 hour)
  • PSYC 2750 Introduction to Measurement and Statistics (3 hours)
  • PSYC 2825 Introduction to Research Methods (3 hours)
  • PSYC 2975 Sophomore Assessment (0 hours)
  • PSYC 3025 Psychology and Ethics (2 hours)
  • PSYC 4925 Senior Capstone: History, Philosophy, and Systems of Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4950 Senior Assessment (0 hour)
  • Psychology electives (at least 3 hours at the 4000-level) (9 hours)

At least ONE course from EACH of the following five Perspectives content areas:

The roles of biological processes, structures and inherited tendencies in explaining human behavior.

  • PSYC 3850 Sensation and Perception (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4300 Health Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4550 Drug and Chemical Dependency (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4650 Biopsychology (3 hours)

The diagnosis and treatment of mental, behavioral disorders and adjustment problems.

  • PSYC 3125 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3775 Personality Theory (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3900 Introduction to Counseling (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4225 Introduction to the Helping Professions (3 hours)

Examination of how individuals grow, develop and change throughout the lifespan.

  • PSYC 2200 Child Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 2250 Adolescent Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 2300 Lifespan Development (3 hours)
  • PSYC 2950 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging (3 hours)

Examination of the mental processes and environmental situations that underlie, shape and control behavior.

  • PSYC 3325 Applied Learning Theory (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3350 Cognitive Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3525 Memory (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3725 Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making (3 hours)

The roles of social and cultural influences on behavior.

  • PSYC 3475 International Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3575 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3600 Social Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3625 Motivation and Emotion (3 hours)

Recommended Courses

  • PSYC 4425 Community Practicum (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4825 Senior Thesis (3 hours)

Only the Bachelor of Arts in Psychology requires 3 international language requirement credit hours.

  • A minimum of 3 credit hours in a non-native language (expertise demonstrated by coursework or testing) are required in addition to the requirements for the major. Courses used toward the international language requirement may also be used to fulfill general education requirements or a major/minor in a foreign language.
  • Transfer students who have completed their 3 credit hours at an institution of higher education are considered to have fulfilled the requirement, as are students who have scored a "3" or higher on an Advanced Placement exam in a non-native language.
  • Students whose native language is not English and who are studying English will be considered to have achieved their foreign language requirement if they successfully pass an ESL test of their English proficiency (e.g., TOEFL). Students who are from bilingual families but have no evidence of academic study of the second language on a transcript will need to take one course.

The Psychology: General minor is appropriate for students who are pursuing a career that has a significant connection to psychology and who wish to deepen their understanding of human behavior by exploring relevant psychological theories and concepts.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, students will be able to:

  • Describe the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings and historical trends in psychology.
  • Implement the use of scientific reasoning to interpret psychological phenomena and demonstrate the ability to interpret, design and conduct basic psychological research using statistical analyses.
  • Apply ethical standards to evaluate psychological science and practice and apply those standards to build and enhance interpersonal relationships locally and globally.
  • Demonstrate effective writing, exhibit effective presentation skills and interact effectively with others.

Special Requirements

In addition to the general University requirements for a minor:

  • The psychology: general minor cannot be earned by students currently majoring in psychology (BA, BA with an emphasis in mental health, BS) or psychological science (BS).
  • Students who transfer any required course for the minor (e.g., PSYC 1100, PSYC 2300) must take an additional 3 credit hour PSYC elective per substitution at Webster University. A maximum of two such substitutions are permitted.

Curriculum

  • PSYC 1100 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours)

Three courses from the following:

  • PSYC 2300 Lifespan Development (3 hours)
  • PSYC 2825 Introduction to Research Methods (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3125 Abnormal Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3325 Applied Learning Theory (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3350 Cognitive Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3600 Social Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3775 Personality Theory (3 hours)
  • PSYC 3900 Introduction to Counseling (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4225 Introduction to the Helping Professions (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4300 Health Psychology (3 hours)
  • PSYC 4650 Biopsychology (3 hours)

Two courses with any PSYC prefix (6 hours)

Learn More

Founded in 1915, Webster University is committed to ensuring high-quality learning experiences that transform students for global citizenship and individual excellence. In 2014, Webster Athens joined our network to bring the best of American education with the only fully owned and controlled (academically and financially) accredited campus of a U.S. university in Greece.

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